38 Comments
Mar 5Liked by The Saxon Cross

I have been seldom so moved as I was reading this. How I hope you are right! That hope makes me willing to bear more sorrow and wait.

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Mar 5Liked by The Saxon Cross

I have a fond memory of walking over the Tor one night some 20 years ago, back to my campground after an evening of pints. A cat had literally shown us around, from pub to pub. He was known by the locals, and if the cat dragged you in, you could stay late. In any event, I remember the thick fog and what seemed like faces emerging from the mist. And a lady singing, or was it humming?, I’m not sure. But it was a haunting melody. A haunted night. And I loved every minute of it ~ waiting for someone or something to emerge from the woods along my path. Some dark sorcerer perhaps. Needless to say, I made it home to my tent where I slept that night under an apple tree. The place is full of old magic — no question.

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Mar 4·edited Mar 5Liked by The Saxon Cross

Very well said. Most lads in England go about their lives in this haze of mediocrity and passiveness. Myself included probably. The godlessness is also really apparent. I must get back to going to church this year, no excuses... Despite the sorry state of the English youth, I agree with what you think, because the land is so potent with memory, and perhaps because of the Anglo spirit also, it doesn't take much to stir something within us. There is so much of Old England's mythos that is still there to see. The key is turning it into something more than a passing whimsy, something more than just a melancholic Sunday afternoon wandering around 'some old ruin', before the inevitable return to the grey monotony of modern Britain. I'm glad you got to see the good parts of Wessex and the South-West. You have probably spent more time down there than I have! Perhaps when you do return I can show you around where I'm from in the Cumbrian fells. I am away on my own quest at the minute, currently in the Orkney Islands, I keep being driven further north and I think I might end up doing a season on a farm in Iceland. Hope to see more posts from you this year.

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Orkney fascinates me, I hope to go someday

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Mar 9Liked by The Saxon Cross

May/June is the best time to visit. 4 - 7 days is probably about right for a trip. There's plenty of interesting historical sites and beautiful coastlines to walk, but an almost complete lack of trees. A lot of the sites of interest are on the Orkney 'mainland' (the biggest island where most folk live) but it is worth getting the ferries out to some of the smaller islands. Hoy is probably the best island for walking, it has a small ancient woodland called Berriedale, as well as the only true hills on the Orkney islands, and of course the Old Man of Hoy, the largest sea stack in Britain. Most of Orkney is green fields and farmland, but Hoy is more rugged, closer to what Shetland feels like. I suggest May/June because the weather is generally the best, meaning you can take advantage of the coast more and swim, kayak, walk along the beach etc. Winters in Orkney are dark and extremely windy.

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You may be disappointed with the Church. The C of E seems Godless now and is increasingly 'woke'. The Anglican Communion has severed its ties due to the C of E's heresy. Sad days indeed.

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No worries. King Arthur was Catholic.

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Hail fellow Cumbrian.

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Mar 5·edited Mar 5Liked by The Saxon Cross

Thank you for writing this. It is great to see someone get it and understand. I feel the same way about America and the other Anglosphere countries. We forget just how unique we are. The unusual origins of our amazing shared culture. A rainy island in the north of Europe unlike any other.

I have no time for the naysayers. Their takes of gloom just classify them as the category of people who won't be rebuilding the nation. They don't have that drive.

As for the foreign hordes. They are here for the dole money and that is becoming increasingly obvious. They create nothing, build nothing and maintain nothing. We see all this in the US too. White America is castigated but no other group can maintain even basic utilities.

Our countries have become a microcosm of the world, as predicted. Some of it works, most is dysfunctional. But the decision to allow mass immigration will rank as the absolute worst decision made for all our nations. We know it won't be easy to fix.

I am pleased to read a positive account of my country for once. We need more of this. We need to remind everyone how tough Anglo culture actually is.

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Mar 5Liked by The Saxon Cross

The Return of The King

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Very moving. I will re-read later. A smouldering resentment and rage is correct. For those of us aware and suffering under our current predicament, the blood of our ancestors calls.

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Totally agree. And as Kipling's poem reminds us, we are slow to anger. We put up with a lot which certain imported cultures mistake as softness. When Northern Europeans snap it tends to be very energetic.

I fear we are being pushed beyond breaking point by people who misunderstand us.

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One can only hope that Kai Murros is correct in his belief that when we are pushed to the edge, where our very survival is at stake, we will rise up and fight.

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I don't think we will rise up and fight. I think we will rediscover why we are the top dogs. And others will discover why they are not.

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How exactly? I hope that you're right.

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The devil is in the details. We know in Anglosphere countries certain groups are artificially promoted. In some parts of the US people other than us are running the show and have been for decades. All these places are in decline. They look like the third world. They are dysfunctional.

It requires certain properties to accomplish a stable prosperous society. Northern Europeans do this best.

Much of the decay we see around us is not natural. It has been artificially induced by those with a simplistic view of how the world works. The blank slate. We are living through the disputation of that idea. Dysfunction alone will mean things change.

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Mar 5Liked by The Saxon Cross

A beautiful and invigorating read.

Thank you.

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Mar 5Liked by The Saxon Cross

Sums it up perfectly. The many will join the few, acknowledge the blood of their ancestors running through their veins and this island will slumber no longer!

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Mar 5Liked by The Saxon Cross

Yes, we're not dead yet, and I suspect there's going to be a vigorous reaction soon - within two years of the coming Starmer government taking power is my guess (hope)

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If Labour get in it will be open borders I fear. They are absolutely lost.

We clearly need a different approach. And nothing is on the horizon. They have effectively banned any new patriotic party from forming. And of course the media is absolutely lost.

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Mar 5Liked by The Saxon Cross

Beautifully written! In my childhood memories of West country life it seemed that we were cradled in England's ancient past, its Christian, Celtic and Pagan legends, place names and mysterious stone circles its magic, its winding lanes, villages, country inns and public houses. It's difficult to know, whether that has all changed or I just grew up and lost my childhood dreams.

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Mar 5Liked by The Saxon Cross

You've read That Hideous Strength, I take it?

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author

I have, such an underrated novel

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Mar 10Liked by The Saxon Cross

Prophetic.

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Men without chests.

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Beautiful and so melancholic, yet hopeful.

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This is beautifully written. And (as an Englishman) has articulated better than I ever could what has been in my mind and heart for many years. I also hope to see a resurrected England - this side of the new heavens and earth though, I’m not sure.

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Mar 9Liked by The Saxon Cross

As an Englishman I just want to say thank you for writing this. Even in our lifetimes the pace of change is massive and I fear things will continue to get worse before there's a chance for things to get better. It's good to know that there are others from elsewhere cheering us on. One day the King will return.

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Mar 8Liked by The Saxon Cross

A few years ago, I returned to visit my home country of Macedonia. What you said reminds me very much of my thoughts regarding my own home country. It may be occupied by the forces of Liberalism, Globalism, and all the Civilization of Satan...but in its roots, in the relics of our Orthodox Christian saints and the people who love their Orthodox heritage, there is still hope. That's precisely what holds the people together and preserves them in Orthodox countries - the Church, the heritage, and the people who hold on to both (for they are essentially inseparable).

I hope England feels a revival. I've read some of its historic legends and mythology - a truly amazing place.

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I hope you're right. The corruption of England is exceptionally acute, and it is a pathetic fate for a country such as Britain used to be. But I wouldn't dismiss other countries in Europe out of hand. It may be that they lack certain cultural characteristics the English once took for granted. But they'll find their own way. Glad there are still corners of Old England worth checking out: I'd considered writing off the place entirely based on what Britain has become: but perhaps a near-future trip to a few corners is still worth the journey.

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I know that we, Eastern Europeans, have our Orthodox heritage to inspire us. No matter how much the West may push its occupational policies in Greece, Bulgaria, or any other country, there will always be the element of the Orthodox Church and the patriots - who will fight to the bitter end to preserve the culture of our Greco-Slavic nations.

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