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Interesting read. Thank you.

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Thank you for the insightful article. Subscribed!

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Very cool post. Another book you'd find interesting as it pertains to the location of Faerie is Sandor Petofis poem John the Valiant, he being Hungary's national poet.

Maybe you answered this in a previous post, but it begs the question: if the Tree of Life is Yggdrasil and Morgoth is Satan (assisted by Ungoliant), what would the Tree of Knowledge and Evil be equivalent to? In Tolkien, my guess is that it would be the silmarils to some degree because they were the catalyst of the Noldor's self-exile from Valinor: but even then, it's a limited comparison because even though they are the curse of the First Age, Morgoth can't hold them in his bare hand either. When Beren and Luthien reclaim the Silmaril, are they reclaiming the key back to paradise?

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Owen Barfield, under the influence of Rudolf Steiner and Anthroposophy, once wrote that while the modern mind assumes that its relation to nature holds through time and history, that's an assumption that can hardly be sustained by any current form of secular knowledge.

I'm partial to the idea that beings of spirit once walked with us here, in the material world, until something changed and left us mostly cut off from the higher realms. The approved history is a narrative of matter that has forgotten the intangible, by design or accident.

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This was a remarkable exploration of the mythic, literary, and metaphysical structure of Faerie. It seems that it has a sort of fractal aspect, as any good tree should - there's the central trunk, the primordial Eden itself, and then there are the outposts replicating that Eden in miniature.

I wonder - does Hell not possess the same structure?

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I would say it absolutely does, I think one could draw the connection between biblical Hel, mythological underworld, and then Mirkwoods, devils bogs, haunted moors etc in our own world

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This is what I was thinking too.

I also wonder how deeply the interpenetration goes. What we think of as the real or normal world may be simply that which is furthest removed, but nevertheless still a part of the archetypal structure.

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Yeah we tend to think of our world as the norm, when in reality we’re the exception, the disenchanted realm

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You’re showing us behind the veil and through the looking glass.

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Close, but a miss.

Hyperborea means beyond North, and refers not to the North pile, but the North star.

Hyperborea, as Eden is beyond movement and thus beyond time. Literally the heaven above heaven (the latter one being the one that turns.) And as the latter heaven has 7 spheres, the fix stars are the 8th heaven and thus hyperborea, beyond the northern fix star is the 9th heaven.

So that brings me to Kepheus, the constellation, the bearded man sitting on the throne of heaven. The name, means gardener, yes.. that is God. Polaris is the Apple, and the serpent is not far away (draco).

Adam=perseus and eve is andromeda, Literally coming out of his rib, at least it is written thus in the sky.

Next, the realm where the elves, ie the ancestors enter into this realm, the silver gates in the pleidades, situated by the Taurus head. There Adam enters into time (the ecliptic), and thus he will toil the soil, as a farmer.

Same gate is also the gate through which Jesus cane btw, and perseus is also Balder, Eros and Amor.. the Gods of Love.

The mountain btw, is the milky way, blue Mountain in my native Sweden. Where Odin lived. (See Kepheus again).

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I was pretty old by the time I realized that I could get my ideas across much better simply by removing a statement such as "close, but a miss" from either the beginning or the end of what I have to say.

If you think about it, the delta in semantic content is minimal.

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